NDSU Equine Science Faculty Teach Horsemanship In Europe

NDSU was selected to teach horsemanship clinics internationally for the American Quarter Horse Association. NDSU instructors taught in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Belgium during a trip June 24-July 15.

Only four universities in the country were chosen to teach the clinics.

Participating NDSU instructors included Carrie Hammer, associate professor of animal sciences and equine science director; Tate Eck, lecturer of animal science and rodeo team coach; and Tara Swanson, lecturer of animal science and western equestrian team coach. NDSU students Katelyn Whitehead and Hayley Sauber also assisted during the trip.

According to Hammer, the group provided horsemanship instruction to more than 50 individuals ranging in age from 12 to more than 50. The clinics were 3 to 4 days long in each country, with the goal to improve riding skills while increasing awareness of western style of riding and associated events. Instruction included basic and advanced horsemanship, as well as trail, reining, ranch riding and roping.

“The great thing about horses is that it doesn’t matter where you live or what language you speak – good horsemanship is universal, and it is always rewarding to see a rider learn to connect with their horse in a new way,” said Hammer. “Being able to represent NDSU and showcase our equine science faculty to an international audience was an amazing experience.”

Whitehead described the trip as the highlight of her collegiate career. “I’ve learned so much through this experience; not only about the world abroad but also horsemanship and helping others succeed with their horses,” she said.

Funding was provided through a grant from the American Quarter Horse Association, which is the world’s largest equine breed registry and membership organization. It has headquarters in Amarillo, Texas.

As a student-focused, land-grant, research university, we serve our citizens.